STEVE SMITH ENDOWMENT

The Steve Smith Endowment will provide a financial base for the Arkansas Game and Fish Foundation, giving it the ability to embark on projects, programs, and services bolstering the mission of the Foundation in its goal of supporting the needs of the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.  The Endowment was created by AGFF Board Member Witt Stephens, who announced a challenge gift for the fund, vowing to match every dollar raised up to $150,000!   Please click on the link below to make your gift.

 

Steve Smith served as president of the Arkansas Game and Fish Foundation for 25 years.  During his tenure, Steve guided many foundation projects, including the purchase of the Robinwood addition to Wattensaw Wildlife Management Area, the purchase of a 421-acre tract for Fred Berry Conservation Education Center on Crooked Creek, and the development of the Arkansas Game and Fish Foundation Shooting Sports Complex in Jacksonville. Steve passed away March 22, 2017, at the age of 70.

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Hall of Fame

Rollie Remmel

Ducks throughout North America benefit from the enthusiastic activities of Rollie and Ruth. They are veterans of decades of fundraising for Ducks Unlimited, and their unique “Rollie Sticks” have been presented to special people worldwide.

Ruth Remmel

Ducks throughout North America benefit from the enthusiastic activities of Ruth and Rollie. They are veterans of decades of fund raising for Ducks Unlimited, and their unique “Rollie Sticks” have been presented to special people worldwide.

Butch Richenback

Richenback learned the basics of duck calling from the legendary Chick Major, as did many Stuttgart youngsters. Richenback stuck with Major in learning how to make duck calls as well as how to use them. He built the successful Rich-N-Tone company but kept a focus on teaching and encouraging young people in the sport of duck hunting and in duck calling in particular. He has served as Stuttgart’s mayor as well as head of its Boys and Girls Club.

Win Rockefeller

He has put effort and resources into the outdoors, from Ducks Unlimited to The Nature Conservancy and other wildlife habitat endeavors. He was a key figure in creating public ownership of wetlands along Cache River, Point Remove Creek and Bayou DeView.

Winthrop Paul Rockefeller

LEGACY AWARD WINNER

Winthrop Paul Rockefeller: Businessman, politician, conservationist and avid outdoorsman,
the late Winthrop Paul Rockefeller was a man for all seasons. His legacy of public service includes being
the driving force behind the creation of The Nature Conservancy in Arkansas, founding the International Billfish Conservation Foundation and serving on the national board for Boy Scouts of America. He also spearheaded The National Rifle Association’s Project ChildSafe in Arkansas, distributing hundreds of free trigger locks to gun owners statewide.

Jane Ross

With a fortune in Arkansas timberlands, she put the resources to good use for present and future generations. Her Ross Foundation has backed endeavors from Arkadelphia cultural activities to investigating the die-off of bald eagles.

Gene Rush

A wildlife biologist, he was a hands-on participant in the restoration of Arkansas's deer, bear and turkey populations. He pushed for acquisition of critical lands for state management areas as the Game and Fish Commission's wildlife chief.

Tommy Sanders

Tommy Sanders of Little Rock followed his graduation from Hendrix College with energy and enthusiasm into the television outdoors world. Tommy’s promotion of Arkansas’ hunting and fishing opportunities drew the attention of outdoor enthusiasts to this state. His clear and straightforward announcing has become a fixture on the multiple programs related to hunting and fishing on ESPN, the cable network, with Sanders often working in close proximity with veteran producer Jerry McKinnis of Little Rock in projects all over the North American continent.

John Selig

As an attorney who served as Arkansas Game and Fish Foundation Chairman, he negotiated many key conservation agreements and was instrumental in the acquisition of the 421-acre Crooked Creek tract, opening Kelley's slab and miles of Crooked Creek to public access.

Steve Smith

The person who launched the Arkansas Outdoor Hall of Fame has been pushed from behind the scenes into the limelight. Steve Smith of Little Rock, president of the Arkansas Game and Fish Foundation, has been added to three other 2003 inductees into the select group by the foundation's board of directors. Smith has been with the foundation nearly 13 years and was named president in 1998.

David Snowden, Jr.

David Snowden Jr. has been closely involved with the Arkansas Nature Conservancy since it was launched in the 1970s. He has served as the chairman of the organization and helped with numerous land acquisitions and conservation easements for private and public use.

David Snowden, Sr.

David Snowden Sr. has been closely involved with the Arkansas Nature Conservancy since it was launched in the 1970s. He has served as the chairman of the organization and helped with numerous land acquisitions and conservation easements for private and public use.

Phyllis Speer

Phyllis Speer's sideline has made her a celebrity across the state in addition to her two decades in educational work for the Game and Fish Commission. She has won renown and a following as the co-host and cooking specialist on the popular Arkansas Outdoors program on Arkansas Educational Television Network.

Witt Stephens, Jr.

The Little Rock resident has quietly lent a hand in a myriad of Arkansas outdoor projects, with many of his efforts unknown except to a handful of others associated in the undertaking. A member of the Arkansas Game and Fish Foundation for years, Stephens served a seven-year term on the Game and Fish Commission from 1993 to 2000. He was only 25 years old when appointed. Stephens was a key figure behind the scenes in the strenuous 1996 campaign to pass a Conservation Sales Tax.

Jane Stern

Her years of influence and accomplishments on the conservation and environmental scene illustrate the effectiveness of a small, intense, focused voice. A resident of Pine Bluff, she was a leader of the Jefferson Wildlife Association.

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